Shopping Selection Add on Gift Order Details Review Confirmation
TYPE OF FLOWERS AND IT'S MEANINGS
ALSTROEMERIA

ALSTROEMERIA
Resembling a miniature lily, alstroemeria, often called the Peruvian Lily or Lily of the Incas, was named after its discoverer, Baron Claus von Alstromer, a Swedish baron who collected the seeds.
AMARYLLIS

AMARYLLIS
Legend has it that the amaryllis – the stunning red flower we’ve come to associate with the holidays – began as a shy, timid nymph. Amaryllis fell deeply in love with Alteo, a shepherd with Hercules’ strength.
ANEMONE

ANEMONE
The name anemone comes from the Greek word for “windflower.” According to Greek mythology, the anemone sprang from Aphrodite’s tears as she mourned the death of Adonis.
ANTHURIUM

ANTHURIUM
With their open, heart-shaped flowers and tropical disposition, it’s no wonder that anthurium have come to symbolize hospitality. Also known as the Flamingo Flower, Boy Flower, Painted.
ASTER

ASTER
With their wildflower beauty and lush texture, asters have long been considered an enchanted flower. In ancient times, it was thought that the perfume from their burning leaves could drive.
BIRD OF PARADISE

BIRD OF PARADISE
Bearing an unmistakable resemblance to a brightly colored bird in flight, bird of paradise are native to south Africa and represent joyfulness and (not surprisingly) paradise itself. Also known as Crane flowers.
BLUE FLOWERS

BLUE FLOWERS
Blue flowers hold a special significance in the language of flowers and apparently – given their long-standing popularity – a special place in our hearts as well. Whether it’s the deep blue petals of an iris.
CARNATION

CARNATION
With a history that dates back more than 2,000 years, it’s not surprising that carnations are rich with symbolism, mythology and even debate. While some scholars suggest that their name comes…
CHRYSANTHEMUM

CHRYSANTHEMUM
With a history that dates back to 15th century B.C., chrysanthemum mythology is filled with a multitude of stories and symbolism. Named from the Greek prefix “chrys-“ meaning golden (its original color) and.
DELPHINIUM (LARKSPUR)

DELPHINIUM (LARKSPUR)
Derived from the Greek word “delphis,” meaning dolphin, delphinium are also commonly known as larkspur. Other names include Lark’s Heel, Lark’s Claw and Knight’s Spur. Used by Native Americans.
FREESIA

FREESIA
Named after the German physician Friedrich Heinrich Theodor Freese, freesia – with their bell-shaped blooms and sweet, citrus scent – are among the most popular fragrant flowers. And, while in most cases.
GERBERA

GERBERA
Primary Significance: The fifth most popular flower in the world, gerbera daisies can mean innocence, purity, and cheerfulness. These large daisy variations come in a number of vibrant colors, and sending them is the perfect way to brighten someone's day.
GIADIOLA

GIADIOLA
Named for the shape of their leaves, gladioli – from the Latin word “gladius,” meaning sword – have a history than spans from Africa to the Mediterranean. Symbolizing strength and moral integrity, gladioli….
HELICONIA CRAB CLAW

HELICONIA CRAB CLAW
Native to the Tropics, areas of the world where the sun reaches a point directly overhead at least once during the solar year, tropical flowers are sometimes called exotic flowers because of their.
Hydrangea

Hydrangea
First discovered in Japan, the name hydrangea comes from the Greek “hydor,” meaning water, and “angos,” meaning jar or vessel. This roughly translates to “water barrel,” referring to the hydrangea’s need for plenty.
IRIS

IRIS
The iris’s mythology dates back to Ancient Greece, when the goddess Iris, who personified the rainbow (the Greek word for iris), acted as the link between heaven and earth. It’s said that purple irises were…
LILAC

LILAC
The story of lilac, according to Greek mythology, begins with a beautiful nymph named Syringa (lilac’s botanical name). Captivated by her beauty, Pan, the god of the forests and fields, chased Syringa.
LILY

LILY
Dating as far back as 1580 B.C., when images of lilies were discovered in a villa in Crete, these majestic flowers have long held a role in ancient mythology. Derived from the Greek word “leiron,”.
LISIANTHUS / EUSTOMA

LISIANTHUS / EUSTOMA
With a host of names – from Texas Bluebell to Prairie Gentian to Lira de San Pedro – lisianthus symbolize an outgoing nature. Native to Texas and Mexico, and descended from a North American wildflower.
ORCHID

ORCHID
The most highly coveted of ornamental plants, the delicate, exotic and graceful orchid represents love, luxury, beauty and strength. In ancient Greece, orchids were associated with virility. In fact, Greek.
PEONY

PEONY
With a recorded history that dates back thousands of years, it’s not surprising that even the mythology surrounding the origin of the peony has multiple versions. One legend has it that the peony is named.
PROTEA

PROTEA
Among the oldest families of flowers on earth, dating back 300 million years, Greek legend tells us that protea were named after Proteus, the son of Poseidon. A sea god who had the power to know all things.
RANUNCULAS

RANUNCULAS
Native to Asia and celebrated for its medicinal properties as well as its bright beauty, the small camellia-like ranunculus ranges from white to pink, red to yellow to orange. Also known as Buttercup.
ROSE

ROSE
Long a symbol of love and passion, the ancient Greeks and Romans associated roses with Aphrodite and Venus, goddesses of love. Used for hundreds of years to convey messages without words, they also.
SNAPDRAGON

SNAPDRAGON
Derived from the Greek words “anti,” meaning like, and “rhin,” meaning nose, antirrhinum, the snapdragon’s botanical name, is a fitting description of this snout-shaped flower. It’s said that the common.
STATICE

STATICE
Grown for both its colorful flowers and its everlasting calyx (the green leaf that encloses the flower bud), statice is also considered an herb, referred to as “sea lavender.” Statice is commonly used in dried.
STOCK

STOCK
A symbol of happy life and contented existence, the stock flower, with its sweet, heady-scented blooms, is native to Southwestern Greece and the Mediterranean.Typically found in white, pink.
SUNFLOWER

SUNFLOWER
While their distinctive and brilliant appearance makes it easy to see why sunflowers have long held our fascination, when they were first grown in Central and South America, it was more for their.
TULIP

TULIP
Originally from Persia and Turkey, tulips were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where they got their common name from the Turkish word for gauze (with which turbans were wrapped) – reflecting.